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About this Blog

Welcome to Po'Nutrition Fax! This blog is about alcohol - it has nothing to do with health or wellness, and the only relationship between this and Edgar Allen Poe is that he was an alcoholic.

I used to work in a liquor store and developed a taste for all different types of booze. As my collection grew, I felt the need to share my knowledge of, interest in, and experiences with my purchases - from the standards (e.g. whisk(e)y, gin) to the less-than-standard (e.g. kirschwasser, raki). You'll also find a lot on beer (another love of mine).

This is not about how much I can drink nor do I promote over-excess of alcohol. As with most blogs, there is some self-reflection included with most of the reviews. The point is to encourage everyone to reflect on what they drink.

Leave comments or ask questions! Also, "follow" me if you like what you read - I am not making money from this blog but if I see more interest in this and hear some feedback, it will encourage me to write more.

Cheers!
Mike

Saturday, June 16, 2012

Great Lakes Brewing Co. The Wright Pils


Like the bock, pilsners are a hit-or-miss kind of beer for me.  The pilsner is a lager-beer style that is usually light and dry with a floral aroma.  Its origins are the city of Pilsen (currently in the Czech Republic) hence the name "Pilsner."  My initial exposure to this style came by way of Labatt Blue.

Being from Western New York, our close proximity to Canada meant easy access to "better macrobeer" in the forms of Labatt and Molson.  Labatt USA even moved its headquarters to Buffalo based on its popularity in the Buffalo area.  However, I only noticed this odd obsession with Labatt in the behavior of my "Buffalo-Ex-Pat" friends - whenever they saw it elsewhere in the country, they'd lose their shit and order it.  Or when they came home, they'd drink excessive amounts of it.  Perhaps it's because Buffalonians are fiercely loyal to their home city, so any sign of "Buffalo-ness" brings out this fervent reaction.  However, Labatt is originally from Canada, not Buffalo, so I hope if these same "expats" saw Flying Bison out of state, then the same visceral reaction would occur.  Nevertheless, Labatt Blue is a pilsner-style beer and since it is the most popular one, it is the pilsner I have had most often.

While in my early beer-drinking days (i.e. late high-school through early undergraduate university), I was part of this Labatt-drinking consortium.  I did prefer it to the Stateside macrobrews (i.e. the Anheuser-Busch portfolio) but as I learned in later years, while it is a pilsner-style, it is made using corn/maize (as most macrobrews are). Consequently, I can taste the corn/maize in it - which distracts from the beer-drinking experience.  Since this discovery, I've had trouble separating Labatt Blue from all other pilsners in my mind.  Most often, I see "Pils" or "Pilsner" on a beer list and I think "I'll pass on that - I don't like pilsners," but really I don't like Labatt Blue (at least, anymore).

That being said, when I saw Great Lakes Brewing made this pilsner I thought I should give it a try (since Great Lakes is one of my favorite breweries).  Plus, I'd been looking to try out my new pilsner glass.  The confluence of these two forces pushed me into purchasing this beer.  Not being familiar with how to pour a pilsner properly, I looked in the back of Michael Jackson's "Ultimate Beer" book. Formation of a head is important with a beer like the pilsner - this helps to release the aromas of the beer.  However, because this beer foams quickly, you need a taller glass to allow for this head and a normal pint glass will not do.  After pouring, I looked over my pilsner and, no surprise, it had a pale-straw color and a floral nose with a mineral hint.  It had a slightly heavier body than expected but it was very clean and refreshing - plus I did not taste any corn/maize!

All in all, this was a very pleasant pilsner experience.  It is probably going to be my new summer beer style (no longer is the hefeweisse king of the summer beer for me).  I suggest trying this out - especially you Buffalonians who can't stop losing your shit over Labatt.

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